Do Distracting Activities Increase Tolerance for an Infant Cry?

Professionals recommend parents engage in distracting activities to mitigate negative effects of inconsolable infant crying (e.g., Deyo, Skybo, & Carroll, 2008; Goulet et al., 2009). In a study recently published in the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, researchers evaluated the availability of alternative activities on six undergraduates’ tolerance for a recorded infant cry; three students tolerated the cry longer when distracting activities were available. These results show that distracting activities could decrease the aversiveness of inconsolable infant crying for some individuals; additional research in natural caregiving situations will help determine the generality and social validity of this finding

For the abstract

           

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