PTSD Professional Perspective– PTSD and Applied Kinesiology Techniques to Help

In my PTSD recovery I used ten — count ‘em TEN — modalities to get through to PTSD freedom. What would have happened if I quit after the first three failed? Hmmm… That’s a very good question! I could still be miserable, sleepless, anxious, angry, numb and terrified.

How about you? Are you continuing to move forward by trying out different techniques until you find the one that works for you? There are many PTSD treatment options. Today, Dr. Vittoria Repetto introduces us to a technique that could help you.

PTSD and Applied Kinesiology Techniques to Helpvittoria-repetto1

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a type of anxiety disorder that’s triggered by a traumatic event; sufferers may have the following symptoms of nightmares, insomnia, flashbacks, rage, emotional numbing, hypervigiliance, hyperarousal, depression, anxiety, intrusive thoughts and avoidance.

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/post-traumatic-stress-disorder/DS0024

There are a number of techniques that can help the PSTD patient cope better w/ their stresses and there are even techniques that the patient can practice at home.

The first one involves the adrenal glands, an organ involved in our sympathetic reflex or “the fight or flight reaction” Continuous stress can cause the adrenals not to function optimally; symptoms can include fatigue, insomnia, depression brain fog, etc. if the adrenals are involved, then the PTSD patient might present w/ weak Sartorius muscle, a craving for salty foods, blood pressure that drops upon sudden standing or their pupils may have a sluggish reaction to light.

Help for the adrenals involves stimulation of the neurolymphatics and neurovascular points associated w/ the Sartorius muscle and it’s link via the Chinese meridian system to the adrenals. This is a technique that the patient can do at home.

Another muscle to look at is the Pectoralis Clav. Major that is associated to the stomach via the Chinese meridian system. We know that anxiety and stress being a predisposing factor in stomach dysfunction raging form “butterflies” in the stomach, to a gastric ulcer to emotional chest pain.

The patient’s Pectoralis muscle would be tested while recalling a traumatic event If the muscle tests weak, then the doctor contacts the emotional neurovascular reflex pt until a synchronous pulse is felt bilaterally. Then the patient again recalls the traumatic event and the pectorals are re-tested. If the pectorals test strong, then the emotional recall is lessened in its ability to affect the patient. And the patient is taught to do the reflex work at home.

Another technique involves negating a patient’s self-sabotaging behavior. We have the patient speak a positive statement such as “I want to be healthy” and if that statement causes any muscle to be weak then we know that there is a conflict in the mind-body connection. We then have the patient say the positive phase again while holding either points on the Small Intestine meridian; the point used is the one that allows the previously weak muscle to test strong. An acu-aid is placed on the point and the patient instructed to tap the point if they feel their symptoms creeping up on them.

Another technique is the Temporal Tap which works as an auto-suggestion. The patient is taught to tap the temporo-sphenoidal line on the side of his head while inputting a negative statement such as “I have no need to yell.” on the right side  And then the patient inputs a positive statement such “I will be calm”.

This technique works wonders for insomnia.

Another technique involves holding acupuncture points while the patient thinks about his fears or anger or anxiety and we observe if that “causes a muscle to go weak; meridians associated w/ fear may be the kidney/bladder meridian or the stomach or the liver/gall bladder for anger issues. Then the patient (or the doctor) taps the beginning and end point of the meridian involved and the muscle is re-tested as the patient thinks again about his problem. A positive outcome would be a strong muscle and the patient feeling that his fear has lessened.

As you see with testing by a doctor using applied kinesiology, the patient can actively take a role in becoming healthier, more calm, more social. etc.

Since 1987, Dr. Vittoria Repetto has been in practice as a Doctor of Chiropractic and an Applied Kinesiologist in downtown Manhattan where she was born and raised. She started her road to becoming a healer by getting rid of lifetime ragweed allergies and changing her lifestyle to a healthier one. She treats the whole person , not just symptoms. She knows that balancing your structure, your biochemistry and your mental outlook all contribute to your well-being.

www.drvittoriarepetto.com

http://drvittoriarepetto.wordpress.com

The opinions in this post are solely those of the author. To contribute to ‘Professional Perspective’ contact Michele.

 
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