Bupropion ( Amfebutamone, Wellbutrin, Zyban ) data sheet

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Bupropion ( Amfebutamone, Wellbutrin, Zyban )

Bupropion has a stimulant type of effect and is used primarily for the treatment of major depression. Bupropion can also be used to treat ADHD, Bipolar depression, to treat chronic fatigue syndrome, in reducing cocaine craving, to help kick smoking, and to reduce lower back pain. Bupropion was released for use in the United States of America in 1989.About 28% of persons taking this drug will loss five or more pounds and about 0.04% will experience seizures.

Is Bupropion ( Amfebutamone, Wellbutrin, Zyban ) right for me?

CLASS: Monocyclic Aminoketone.
Generic name: Bupropion Hydrochloride.
Type: Antidepressant.

Strengths:

Tables:
75 mg, 100 mg.

Dosage: Actual dosage must be determined by a physician.

Normal dosage:

If under 18 years of age, DO NOT USE!
18 to 60 years of age, 200 mg in two doses.
Over 60 years of age, Lower dosage increased cautiously.

Oral:

Start: 100 mg in the morning and then 100 mg in the evening, 200 mg total daily.
Increases: After three days, 100 mg morning, 100 mg noon, and 100 mg evening
( 6 hours apart and continued for 3 or 4 weeks. ) May be increased slowly up to 450 mg daily. Increases should not be greater than 100 mg daily over a 3 day period.
Maximum: 450 mg in 24 hours.

Approximately four in every thousand will have seizures.
Higher doses increase risk of seizures.

Prolonged usage: Check kidney / liver function. Check blood levels of serum bupropion.

Problems with:

Liver Function: Lower dosage, as needed with careful monitoring.
Kidney Function: Must lower dosage, as needed.

Test:

Before taking: None.
While taking: None.

Take With: Empty stomach and a full glass of water. Can be taken with food to lessen stomach irritation.

Full Benefits In: In three or four weeks.

Missed Dose(s): If within one hour take, if over an hour skip and then continue on your normal schedule.
Never Take a Double Dose!

If Stop Taking: Do not stop without consulting your physician and never abruptly.

Overdose symptoms include: Heart failure, hallucinations, loss of consciousness, rapid heartbeat, or seizures.

Warnings

Important: Do not take this drug if you are taking any type of monoamine oxidase inhibitor ( MAO )or have taken one within the past two weeks.

Do not take this drug if you have any type of seizure disorder.

Do not take this drug if you have a history of anorexia or bulimia.

Do not drink alcohol while taking this drug.

Do not take this drug if you are pregnant.Try some non-drug alternatives.

Do not take this drug if planning to become pregnant.Do not take if you are breast-feeding.

Do not give this drug to any one under eighteen.If over sixty only use drug in small doses and with close monitoring of its side effects.

The habit-forming potential is none.

Do not use if: You had negative reactions to this drug in the past.If you have a history of epilepsy, bulimia, or anorexia.

Inform your Doctor:
If you have had a negative reactions to this drug in the past.
If you have epilepsy.
If you have heart, liver, or kidney disease.
If you have a history of alcoholism or drug abuse.
If you are taking any other prescription or nonprescription drugs.

Including any antipsychotic or antidepressant type drug:
Clozaril, Dilantan, Haldol, Larodopa, Lithium, Loxapine,
Maprotiline, Molindone, Phenobarbital, Phenothiazines,
Prozac, Tagamet, Thioxanthenes, Trazodone, or Tegretol.

If you will be under anesthesia or have any surgery in the next few months.
If you will be undergoing any medical tests.

Bupropion ( Symptoms or Effects )

Common: Agitation, change in appetite, constipation, diarrhea, dizziness, dry mouth, headache, increased perspiration, insomnia, nausea, or vomiting.

Rare: Acne, blurred vision, chest pain, chills, coordination problems, confusion, decrease in white blood cell count, fainting, fever, gum irritation, hair color changes, hair loss, hallucinations, hives, indigestion, itching, liver toxicity, loss of movement, nightmares, racing heartbeat / palpitations, seizure, skin rash, sexual problems, suicidal thoughts, tinnitus ( ringing in the ears ), excessive thirst, toothaches, tremors, urinary problems, or weight gain / loss.

See physician always: Acne, blurred vision, chest pain, chills, coordination problems, confusion, decrease in white blood cell count, fever, gum irritation, hair color changes, hair loss, hallucinations, hives, indigestion, itching, liver toxicity, loss of movement, racing heartbeat / palpitations, seizure, skin rash, sexual problems, suicidal thoughts, tinnitus ( ringing in the ears ), excessive thirst, toothaches, tremors, urinary problems, vomiting, or weight gain / loss.

See physician if severe: Agitation, change in appetite, constipation, diarrhea, dizziness, dry mouth, headache, increased perspiration, insomnia, nightmares, or nausea.

See physician NOW: Skin rash.

Stop taking and see physician NOW: Fainting or Seizures.

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