Employees who feel obligated end up feeling depressed

work

Take this job and shove it. For many such a sentiment is just a distant dream because they feel obligated to stick with their job for a variety of reasons. According to new research, staying at an organization out of a sense of obligation or for lack of alternatives can lead to emotional exhaustion, a sense of depletion which comes from continuous stress.

People who stay in their jobs because they feel an obligation towards their employer are more likely to experience burnout. This is true as well for people who don’t see any employment options.

“Our study examined whether some forms of commitment to an organization could have detrimental effects, such as emotional exhaustion and, eventually turnover,” explained Alexandra Panaccio, assistant professor in the Department of Management at Concordia’s John Molson School of Business. “When employees stay with their organization because they feel that they have no other options they are more likely to experience emotional exhaustion. This feeling, in turn, may lead them to leave the organization. The implication is that employers should try to minimize this ‘lack of alternatives’ type of commitment among employees by developing their competencies, thus increasing their feeling of mobility and, paradoxically, contributing to them wanting to stay with the organization.”

The researchers looked at a variety of organizational commitments, like whether the employees identified with a company goals and values and whether they felt an obligation to stay.

“It may be that, in the absence of an emotional bond with the organization, commitment based on obligation is experienced as a kind of indebtedness – a loss of autonomy that is emotionally draining,” explained Panaccio.

Source: MedicalNewsToday, Human Relations

 
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