Study finds that depression with atypical features associated with obesity

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Studies have found that Major Depressive Disorder with atypical features is associated with weight gain and obesity, but a new study finds that weight gain often persists even after the remission of the depressive episode.

The study, lead by Aurelie Lasserre, MD at the Department of Psychiatry at Lausanne University Hospital in Switzerland, studied weight gain in patients with MDD. The researchers found that often, the weight gain during Major Depression with atypical features was not temporary, as had been expected, but persistent.

For the study, atypical features were defined as have any two of the following: an increase in appetite, hypersomnia, leaden paralysis, and increased sensitivity to rejection. The study considered patients with Major Depressive Disorder with these atypical features over a five year period.

The study, titled Depression With Atypical Features and Increase in Obesity, Body Mass Index, Waist Circumference, and Fat Mass: A Prospective, Population-Based Study was published in JAMA Psychiatry online in June of 2014. It can be found at this link.

 
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